Wrigley Field, Where Dreams Come True

Chicago Cubs

Kyle Schwarber gets ready to take to the field.

There hasn’t been a game played at Wrigley Field this late in the season in 71 years. The city of Chicago is embracing a celebration tonight. A chance to welcome their hometown Cubs back to October baseball. This is a story that’s bigger than sports. It transcends any high salary that the players will be making, this goes deeper than any supposed curse. The Chicago Cubs playing tonight at Wrigley Field is about hope.

Why should people care if the Cubs win the World Series?

“Ray, people will come Ray. They’ll come to Iowa for reasons they can’t even fathom. They’ll turn up your driveway not knowing for sure why they’re doing it. They’ll arrive at your door as innocent as children, longing for the past. Of course, we won’t mind if you look around, you’ll say. It’s only $20 per person. They’ll pass over the money without even thinking about it: for it is money they have and peace they lack. And they’ll walk out to the bleachers; sit in shirtsleeves on a perfect afternoon.

“They’ll find they have reserved seats somewhere along one of the baselines, where they sat when they were children and cheered their heroes. And they’ll watch the game and it’ll be as if they dipped themselves in magic waters. The memories will be so thick they’ll have to brush them away from their faces. People will come Ray. The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: it’s a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us all that once was good and it could be again. Oh… people will come Ray. People will most definitely come.”

Terrence Mann–Field of Dreams

You can substitute Chicago for Iowa but that’s it. The reason people care about this team, this field and this opportunity to become World Champions is simply because, as Terrence Mann says, It reminds us all of what was once good and it could be again.

People can trace back the roots of other professional sports leagues but baseball, man? They’ll be debating that for centuries. The game of baseball is a common thread throughout North America and the world. A game marked by no time limit. Imagine that? We are not reminded by our own mortality, we are enthralled by legends past like Ted Williams and Babe Ruth. These heroes doing extraordinary things and this year’s version is Kyle Schwarber. He went out two games into the season with a torn ACL but is back in the World Series without missing a beat.

Tonight, we all have reserved seats at Wrigley Field. Most of us will be in the cheap, cheap seats but our hearts are there at the corner of Clark and Addison. We will be brought back in time as we watch Kyle Hendricks dissect the Cleveland order, cheer when Kyle Schwarber steps up to the plate, nod our heads when Dexter Fowler reaches base and pass Bill Murray a tissue when he needs one the most. If you’re lucky enough to catch a glimpse of Steve Bartman, give him a hug, say you’re sorry but please let him sit somewhere else.

Ernie Banks and Ron Santo are smiling. Harry Carey is calling the game and sharing a Bud with St. Peter. This one’s for them and all those Cubs who built the brick work piece by piece. The heartache, the joy and now the reward. There’ll be no speech from Joe Maddon, the player’s know what’s at stake. It took 71 years to get here again and before I suggest the next comet be named “Cubbie’s Comet” enjoy this moment with family and friends.

“You’re blessed and you’re healed the first time you walk into Wrigley Field.”

Eddie Vedder- All The Way

Believe it.

 

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